Set NTP settings on a Dell server with iDRAC7

Set the DNS first to ensure the iDRAC can resolve the NTP host names:
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.ipv4static.dns1 8.8.8.8

Set the NTP server names:
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.ntp1 0.asia.pool.ntp.org
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.ntp2 1.asia.pool.ntp.org
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.ntp3 2.asia.pool.ntp.org

In case it won’t update the time when FQDN’s are used, IP addresses can also be used:
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.ntp1 129.250.35.250
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.ntp2 180.211.88.50
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.ntp3 202.112.29.82

Enable NTP and set max hops:
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.NTPEnable Enabled
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.NTPConfigGroup.NTPMaxDist 16

Set the timezone:
racadm -r 10.1.1.100 -u root -p calvin set idrac.time.timezone Japan

Use a USB to RS232 serial converter from Ubuntu / Debian

Detection of the USB-Serial converter used on your machine (so you get the correct device name to use later):

1. tail -f /var/log/messages or /var/log/syslog
2. Plug in the USB cable
3. It will show up like this:
Nov 19 16:53:12 nyx kernel: [30040.171597] usb 2-1: FTDI USB Serial Device converter now attached to ttyUSB0

Connect with screen as follows:
screen <device> <speed>
root@nyx:~# screen /dev/ttyUSB0 115200

Disconnect with CTRL+a followed by CTRL+d:
[detached from 4197.pts-2.nyx]

SQL Server setup media does not support the language of the OS: SCVMM deploying non-English VMs in English by default (!)

Ever deployed a non-English Windows server via SCVMM and then tried installing SQL server on it? Won’t work. The OS and SQL server languages have to match and in a stroke of genius SCVMM always make the base deployment for any new VM templates in English!!

What I’d imagine throws most people off is that the OS will display in the language locale you’d expect – Japanese in my case, but underneath the settings will be English. This can be verified by opening the command prompt. All errors will be in English and not the language the GUI is displayed in.

Error message:
“SQL Server setup media does not support the language of the OS or does not have ENU localized files. Use the matching language-specific SQL Server media or change the OS locale”

It’s easy enough to fix with an update to the SCMMM VM templates (use the updated template to re-deploy the server OS):

The InputLocale values must match with “ja-JP” or whatever you wish to use. To get the values, please refer to:

Language Pack Default Values: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766191(v=ws.10).aspx

Default Input Locales: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc766503(v=ws.10).aspx